Frequently Asked Questions

Does the Value Guide value collectible golf clubs?

No. As the National Standard Resource for used golf club values, the purpose of the Value Guide is to serve as a resource for the value of "practical", used golf clubs in the secondary market, and not to serve as a resource for the value of collectible golf clubs. Practical used golf club models are bought and sold more regularly in the secondary market (typically for use), and therefore exhibit more statistically significant and less volatile fair market values. Golf club models that are classified as collectible may have been intentionally produced in low quantities or designed to commemorate an important event, person or accomplishment, both of which would inflate the value of the golf club. These golf clubs may not be typically purchased for use. Also, some older golf clubs become more valuable as a result of their age, rarity or antique status. In these instances where golf club models are classified as collectible, the Value Guide does not provide golf club value statistics.

Why does the PGA support The Value Guide?

The PGA of America - the foremost organization in golf comprised of more than 28,000 men and women PGA Professionals dedicated to growing the game of golf, recognizes The Value Guide as an important tool and resource for its membership and for golfers. The PGA recognizes that a credible and continually updated national golf club value guide is a key influencer toward making a more efficient secondary golf club market, and thereby contributes to lowering the affordability barrier to entry into golf, effectively bringing more golfers to the game.

How does The Value Guide benefit golfers?

The Value Guide provides credible and continually-updated values for thousands of golf club models, and therefore is a great source for consumers planning on trading-in, buying or selling a used golf club. Empowered with this information, golfers can be confident they are getting a fair deal.

How does The Value Guide benefit golf retailers?

Most importantly, it provides a resource for assigning a value to a used golf club trade-in! The Value Guide eases the processes of trading-in, buying and selling used golf clubs. For retailers taking trade-ins, The Value Guide serves as a "safety net" by allowing the retailer to confidently assess and assign values when accepting a used golf club trade-in. This information can also aid the retailer when liquidating or re-selling the used golf clubs that have been traded-in.

Are golf retailers obligated to give the used golf club Trade-In values found in The Value Guide?

While The Value Guide was conceived and developed to fill a need in the golf club market for a National Standard Source for used golf club values, golf club pricing is not dictated by the Value Guide. Retailers are not obligated to honor the Trade-In values, or assign the Re-Sale values, shown in The Value Guide as retailers may find specific circumstances in their business and market, or their personal judgment on the physical condition of a golf club, will determine a different value for a used golf club.

What is the difference between golf club Trade-In and Re-Sale values?

The Value Guide provides both Re-Sale and Trade-In values to meet the needs of those who are buying and selling golf clubs, as well as those involved in trading-in golf clubs toward new golf club purchases.

The Re-Sale value is the price for which a golfer or retailer may reasonably expect to sell a used golf club(s) privately or through a retail shop. The Re-Sale value applies to both the on-line and off-line retail environments.

The Trade-In value represents the price a golfer can expect to receive in credit from a retailer toward the purchase of another golf club. The retailer would then probably either re-sell or liquidate the golf club trade-in (just like in the automobile industry!).

note: The Value Guide provides additional information about the number of transactions on which a golf club value is based, as well as the most recent transaction date. These additional pieces of continually updated information contribute to the confidence level and accuracy of the golf club value range.

Why are three Re-Sale and Trade-In values given for each golf club?

High, Mid, and Low values are included to provide a range in which a used golf club may be confidently valued. Other factors, including condition (a very important factor!), must be taken into account when determining the final value of a particular used golf club.

Why are there no values shown for my golf club?

In the unlikely event that values do not appear for a golf club in The Value Guide, a minimum quantity of transactions for the specific golf club model may not have occurred within The Value Guide's analysis window. In order to maintain accuracy, and therefore uphold credibility in the values, a minimum quantity of "recent" historical data is required within the Value Guide's statistical analysis model. Please note, this does not necessarily mean the golf club has no value!

note: The Value Guide provides additional information about the number of transactions on which a value is based, as well as the most recent transaction date. These additional pieces of continually updated information contribute to the confidence level and accuracy of the value range.

Where can I trade-in my used golf clubs?

The PGA Trade-In Network, a product of the same industry collaboration that created The Value Guide, provides a zip-code-driven dealer locator on the Value Guide for consumers to find authorized PGA Trade-In Network locations nearest them. These are golf club retail facilities that accept golf club trade-ins and employ PGA Professionals. Soon, the PGA Trade-In Network will also offer consumers the ability trade-in their used golf clubs directly on-line for either credit redeemable at authorized PGA Trade-In Network locations, or for cash. In the meantime, ask your local PGA Professional about trading-in your used golf clubs toward new.

Does golf club condition affect value?

YES! Condition is one of several factors that contributes to the overall value of a used golf club. This is true in both the Trade-In and the Re-Sale environments. Naturally a golf club that is in nearly new condition would tend to yield a higher price than a golf club that has clearly been used for several seasons. Further, a golf club that has been abused or damaged has little, if any, value in the secondary market.

Other factors that affect golf club value are harder to quantify, and are more subjective in nature. For example, a busy shop selling new and used golf clubs for 20 years with a nicely appointed showroom and a reputation for outstanding customer service could most likely sell the same golf club for more money than many of its competitors. This in turn may allow that shop to offer higher golf club Trade-In values as well. Of course, each situation is unique, but these, and other fundamental market dynamics (in addition to condition), all contribute to a golf club's overall value.